Writing headlines is a lot like mint chocolate-chip ice cream.

Either you love it… or you think it’s the worst thing ever. (“You know what this ice cream needs? toothpaste!”)

If you’re in the latter group, I’ll show you how to make the process easy — and yes — maybe even fun.

If writing headlines gets you pumped, then these steps may give you an even better way to come up with your best ones.

First, why me?

Well, one of my copywriting superpowers is my ability to distill down ideas and uncover the most important takeaway, a.k.a. “value proposition.”

Your value proposition defines the way you differentiate yourself from your competitors. …


How many times a day do you see websites with headlines such as:

Chances are you hear them so much you tune them out.

Because here’s the thing: They’re so vague that their meaning gets lost.

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And ignored.

What does a “life of your dreams” look like?

What does “breaking free” of the hustle even mean?

What’s an extraordinary life?

And what kind of “greatness” are we talking about?

These questions need answers if you’re going to reach the people who would benefit from your services. …


Recently, someone in my Facebook group (thanks for the question, Gerald!) asked if there was an “easy way to collect emails.” First, we need to define “easy” email tactics.

Easy as in “how can I get a huge list of qualified subscribers without doing any work”?

Or as in, “Can’t I just buy a list or database of people and blast out emails willy nilly?”

In either case: not really.

Here’s the thing: Back in the day (e.g. before 2003), it was easy to collect names and email addresses and send out unsolicited promos without any repercussions, fines, or people protesting outside your window with pitchforks and torches. …


You finally finished a new and improved killer email you know your subscribers will eat up like molten chocolate lava cake.

“It’s a work of art!” You think to yourself as you push back from your desk and stretch your neck. “This one will surely resonate with my audience. They will realize I’m the go-to person for [insert your specialty here].”

But there’s a little nagging voice in your head saying, “Are you suuuure?”

How do you know for certain you’ve done everything within your power to hook your reader and keep them reading?

Checking for typos isn’t enough. You need a way to stand out and be counted and noticed among your readers’ hundreds of emails.

I gotcha covered.

These three simple sweeps, based on tips from Joanna Wiebe of Copyhackers, can not only improve your message but could mean the difference between an email (or landing page) that gets read and clicked… or one that gets deleted with a *yawn.* …


If you’ve ever tried improvising a new recipe and failed spectacularly, you know the importance of following proven steps.

Replacing baking powder with baking soda, for example, makes baked goods taste like soap. (I worked as a pastry chef many decades ago, so trust me on this.)

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Or maybe you don’t mind your dinner guests spitting out their food and abruptly leaving.

In that case, carry on.

For the most part, unless your name is Bobby Flay — who can make an old tennis shoe tasty enough to become a Chopped winner — same goes for writing copy that converts.

Targeted, conversion-oriented, emails, blog posts, landing pages, sales pages and more typically follow proven formulas based on analytics.


On a recent Zoom meeting with a client, I accidentally shared my screen with my email inbox tab open.

Most people’s greatest fear is their SO will walk past the camera in their underwear in the middle of a management meeting.

For me, it’s even more embarrassing: an inbox that’s out of control.

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Yikes! I know.

My other mailbox is even worse.

How much worse? Let’s just say my computer shut down when I tried to delete them all at once.

I’m not proud of it, but there’s always something more important hanging over my head than deleting and unsubscribing.

Zero inbox has never been on my radar. …


On a recent Zoom meeting with a client, I accidentally shared my screen with my email inbox tab open.

Most people’s greatest fear is their SO will walk past the camera in their underwear in the middle of a management meeting.

For me, it’s even more embarrassing: an inbox that’s out of control.

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Yikes! I know.

My other mailbox is even worse.

How much worse? Let’s just say my computer shut down when I tried to delete them all at once.

I’m not proud of it, but there’s always something more important hanging over my head than deleting and unsubscribing.

Zero inbox has never been on my radar. …


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If you’re an introvert like most writers (*raises hand*), you don’t lead the kind of lifestyle that lends itself to risk-taking ventures every day.

So topics like, “How I Survived a 30-Minute Helicopter Ride to the ER After Falling Off an Elephant During an African Safari” won’t appear on many of your subject lines.

If ever.

And staring at a blinking cursor doesn’t (usually) do a whole lot to generate ideas.

One tactic that does work: Ask yourself… what would Seinfeld do?

In case you’re one of the three people who’ve never seen the show, Seinfeld is known as “the show about nothing.”

The writers take the smallest life situations and create an entire episode around it. …


And why time seems to speed up as we age

A gym friend once told me he’d been depressed since his 60th birthday because “That’s the age when you’re officially old.”

Thanks for that, I thought to myself as I was also rounding the same corner within the year.

Then it happened. I turned 60.

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Wait, what?

Turns out: no, no and nope.

That was many moons ago, it only feels like yesterday. …


Why Halloween is the gateway holiday to a year of extra belly fluff

October 31 is the scariest day of the year, and it has nothing to do with Halloween.

Sure, you’re 10x more likely to be attacked by a zombie, scared by a ghost or bitten by a werewolf.

But those incidences pale in comparison to the fright you’ll get when you step on the scale the next day.

That’s right, the only true thing to fear is the Attack of the Fun-Size Candy Bars (insert sounds of screaming and wailing)! These small, miniature treats appear harmless enough. …

About

Linda Melone

I write high-converting copy for businesses and entrepreneurs

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